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GARMIN G1000 GLASS COCKPIT TRANSITION TRAINING

It has finally happened the times have changed in General Aviation we now have Technologically Advanced Aircraft.  We have moved from the Steam Gauge Era to Computer Screens in the cockpit.  There are many traps that pilots fall into while trying to fly the new technology. We have tried to put them all together with our learner based scenario training. We have six different scenarios that we use for training and can tailor to your needs and your insurance company’s requirements.  We include a night training scenario that will help you learn the physiology of night flying and the proper configuration of your G1000 for battling the night skies.  At the completion of our training we will provide you with a completion certificate and a training record tailored to fit your aircraft insurance companies requirements.
Buying a Garmin 1000 equipped aircraft is our business we will help you take delivery of your new aircraft and start your training on your way home.  We are capable of helping add your instrument rating or bringing you back up to skill level you want to achieve with refresher training integrated into transition training teaching you the (knob-ology) of the G1000. If your aircraft is equipped with the Garmin 430 or 530 we can help you with all of these transitions and ratings also. Our scenarios are easily adapted to your training needs and insurance requirements.

OUR PLACE OR YOUR’S

Our instructors will come to your location. Call and we will work with you on affordable travel arrangements. You can also bring your aircraft, spouse and family to enjoy the beauty of the Ozarks while you conduct your training here with us just outside of Springfield, Missouri. We have secured special rates with area hotels for FITSZone students.

OUR COMMITMENT

Flying in the Safety Zone is committed to providing you with user friendly training scenarios, best suited to your kind of flying. We want to provide you with confidence in your aircraft and equipment at the best value for your training dollar. We want to excel in quality flight instruction to our clients to ensure that our customers are trained in accordance to the FAA Industry Training Standards. Our philosophy is to provide quality training in a friendly and easy going atmosphere, whether it is initial, recurrent or building your skill and experience level.

 

BRIAN MORGAN
Chief Instructor

Robert “Brian” Morgan has earned the title of Master Army Aviator and Airline Transport Pilot Airplane (AMEL).  He is typed rated in the C-510S, DHC-4 and SD3 with Commercial pilot ratings in Airplane Single Engine land and Helicopter- Instrument, Certified Flight Instructor ratings in (AMEL, ASEL and Instrument). He has accumulated over 15,000 flying hours in Airplanes and Helicopters. With over 5000 hours of dual given. He has a wide range of aviation background from a U.S. Army UH-1 helicopter crew chief and mechanic to a production test pilot for Cessna Aircraft Company.

 

His flying career started at age 17 after graduation from Jefferson City High School. He served as a helicopter mechanic/crew chief on the UH-1 helicopter.  He obtained an Associate of Science Degree in Aviation Flight Technology, a Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Safety from Central Missouri State University.  While attending the University he earned his flight instructor certificates and performed duties as Flight Instructor for the University.

 

He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Rotary Wing and Fixed Wing courses. His army education also includes graduation from the U.S. Army Maintenance Test Pilot course and Aviation Safety Officer, and UH-1 instructor pilot courses.  His graduate level work includes graduation from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and a Masters Degree in Aviation Safety from Central Missouri State University.

 

He has worked in both military and civil aviation for 30 years.  His experience includes: Safety Engineer and Accident Investigator for a major aviation insurance company, 135 charter pilot, army maintenance test pilot, production test pilot, army helicopter instructor pilot and a certified flight instructor. He is the owner of Flying in the Safety Zone an FAA Accepted insurance approved provider of training in Technically Advanced Aircraft (glass cockpit technology), and also a Designated Pilot Examiner. He is a member of the Army Aviation Association of America (life), National Guard Association of the United States (life), a member of Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Cessna Pilots Association and a member of the Quiet Birdmen.

 

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EMAIL BRIAN

Brian Morgan In The News

STONE COUNTY, Mo. (KSPR) — Two men from the Ozarks are in the hospital after crashing a small plane in a cow pasture.

It happened off State Highway M in Stone County, just south of the Christian County Line. Cory Lummis could scarcely believe his eyes. “It’s not every day you see a plane land in a backyard, so it’s pretty shocking,” he says. Troopers say the pilot made an emergency landing when it appears the engine failed. “At one point they landed in this field over here. They touched down, it looked like the landing was going to go decent, then they came across a pretty big ditch and that kinda mangled up the plane,” said Missouri State Highway Patrol, Corporal Seth Isringhausen.

The plane is registered to a man who lives in Ozark. It’s not known if he was the pilot but troopers say whoever was flying really knew what he was doing. “I think the pilot probably did a pretty good job to land the way they did. It could’ve been a lot worse. The fact that they were transported with minor injuries is pretty amazing,” Corporal Seth Isringhausen stated. Lummis could not be happier no one was severely hurt or worse. “Glad to see everybody is okay,” he says.

A statement from the FAA Spokesperson, Elizabeth Isham Cory, said “The FAA is investigating an event involving a single-engine, small aircraft (m20e), that landed in a field late this afternoon near Springfield, MO. Our investigation into what happened and why take several weeks to complete.”

By Stephanie Garland, KSPR News
Posted: February 18, 2017